Homemade Calamine Lotion

Anyone who enjoys the outdoors knows how itchy you can get if you get into a nasty Poison Ivy patch or a swarm of Mosquitos. Calamine lotion is a necessity when you are out and about in the summer months.

Homemade Calamine Lotion | Real Food RN

Anyone who enjoys the outdoors knows how itchy you can get if you get into a nasty Poison Ivy patch or a swarm of Mosquitos. Calamine lotion is a necessity when you are out and about in the summer months. Of course, being the crunchy Mama that I am, I just had to make my own homemade calamine lotion! The store-bought Calamine contains chemicals that I do not want on my skin or on my family. Check out how it rates with the EWG Skindeep Database:

Homemade Calamine Lotion | Real Food RN

The ingredients in my homemade Calamine lotion are safe and effective. Actually, you can eat it and you would be okay (but really, it’s not tasty so don’t eat it). I’ll break it down for you.

  • Bentonite clay: helps bind to the oils from the Poison Ivy plant, thus reducing the itchy irritation
  • Baking soda: neutralizes acid and soothes
  • Sea salt: reduces inflammation and dries out the oils
  • Glycerine: gives it a nice glide

Thats the short and sweet of it.

What you need:

How to:

  • Mix the dry ingredients in a bowl until well combined.
  • Stir in the water until you get the desired consistency (you might need more or less water)
  • Add in the glycerine (it gives the lotion a smooth consistency, for glide)
  • Store in a small container and use as needed.
Homemade Calamine Lotion | Real Food RN

28 Replies to “Homemade Calamine Lotion”

    1. Any type of clay should work. You can usually find it in the bulk section at your local co-op. I would not leave it out though.

      1. actually when using bentonite clay, it is important NOT to use metal in preparation. everything I read on line and on the manufactures instructions say do not let metal touch clay. use glass, plastic etc.

  1. You don’t have to change to oil and beeswax to prolong shelf life. Just add at least 5 drops vitamine E oil. If you use coconut oil and beeswax it negates all the purpose of this lotion, which is to dry out the poison ivy, or oak, or what ever is making you itch. The clay in this recipe is what dries out the oils from the poison ivy. You could substitute kayolin clay if you don’t like bentonite clay.

    1. Vitamin E is not a preservative, it is an antioxidant which helps lengthen time of rancidity in carriers, the only thing I even see that this would help is the glycerin. When you use water in any recipe, you need a broad spectrum preservative or you need to use it within 2 weeks time. The water grows bacteria as soon as it is added, distilled water will last a little longer but you still need a preservative to use past 2 weeks.

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